Thursday, 20 September 2018

Dentist: Doctors of Oral Health

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about the role played by Dentists!


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Gregg L. Kassan, DDS
Family General Dentist
5077 Waterway Drive
Montclair, VA, 22025
Phone: (703) 897-0463
Website: www.MontclairCosmeticDentist.com

Tuesday, 11 September 2018

Choosing Wisely: 5 Things Every Family Should Know About Dental Health (Part 3 of 3)

Don’t replace fillings just because they’re old 












When you have a cavity, the dentist removes it and puts in a filling. These fillings can last for many years, but some people get silver fillings removed because they don’t like the color. However, the process of removing a filling can weaken the tooth. Additionally, insurance may not cover the removal. 

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

Gregg L. Kassan, DDS
Family General Dentist
5077 Waterway Drive
Montclair, VA, 22025
Phone: (703) 897-0463
Website: www.MontclairCosmeticDentist.com

Tuesday, 4 September 2018

Choosing Wisely: 5 Things Every Family Should Know About Dental Health (Part 2 of 3)

Ask about all the options for calming your child during dental procedures 












Dental work can be scary for some kids. Talk with your dentist about ways to help your child stay calm. Tips for a successful dental visit can include making sure your child is not hungry before their dental appointment and scheduling an appointment at the proper time of day.

For jaw pain, try conservative treatments first 












Jaw pain can be caused by stress, arthritis or an injury. A treatment plan for jaw pain should first consist of actions like exercises and anti-inflammatory drugs.

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

Gregg L. Kassan, DDS
Family General Dentist
5077 Waterway Drive
Montclair, VA, 22025
Phone: (703) 897-0463
Website: www.MontclairCosmeticDentist.com

Monday, 3 September 2018

Tuesday, 28 August 2018

Choosing Wisely: 5 Things Every Family Should Know About Dental Health (Part 1 of 3)

Use toothpaste with fluoride for infants and children 












For children younger than 3 years, you should begin brushing a child’s teeth with fluoride toothpaste in an amount no larger than a grain of rice. For children 3 to 6 years of age, use a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste.

Consider sealants to prevent decay or treat beginning cavities on the back teeth 












Dental sealants act as a barrier to prevent cavities. They are a plastic material applied by a dentist to the chewing surfaces of the back teeth where decay occurs most often.

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

Gregg L. Kassan, DDS
Family General Dentist
5077 Waterway Drive
Montclair, VA, 22025
Phone: (703) 897-0463
Website: www.MontclairCosmeticDentist.com

Monday, 27 August 2018

Saturday, 11 August 2018

How Safe Is Tooth Whitening?

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Colgate.com 

Over a decade of research has proven bleaching and other whitening methods to be both safe and effective. Several products in the market today have shown no adverse effects on teeth or gums in substantial clinical and laboratory testing. Be sure to look for clinically proven products, follow directions and consult with your dental professional.

In the past, the higher bleach concentrations used in-office treatment resulted in more sensitivity. Today, however, bleaching gels are well buffered, making sensitivity less of an issue. Sensitivity may occur in people after whitening procedures, particularly when they eat hot or cold foods, but usually disappears after 48 hours and stops completely when treatment is stopped.

If you do experience sensitivity, there are several ways you can help eliminate it:

  • If using a tray applicator, wear the tray for a shorter period
  • Brush with a toothpaste made for sensitive teeth that contains potassium nitrate to help soothe tooth nerve ending
  • Ask your dentist or pharmacist for a product with fluoride, which helps re-mineralize your teeth. Brush-on or wear in your trays four minutes prior to and after whitening your teeth
  • Stop whitening your teeth for several days to allow you teeth to adapt to the whitening process. Within 24 hours, the sensitivity will cease. The longer you whiten your teeth, the less sensitivity you will experience

In a few cases, your dentist may discourage dental bleaching:

  • If you have gum disease, teeth with worn enamel, cavities or particularly sensitive teeth
  • If you're pregnant or breast-feeding
  • If you have tooth-colored crowns, caps or other dental work in your front teeth, which can't be bleached

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com.

Gregg L. Kassan, DDS
Family General Dentist
5077 Waterway Drive
Montclair, VA, 22025
Phone: (703) 897-0463
Website: www.MontclairCosmeticDentist.com

Saturday, 4 August 2018

Bruxism: Signs And Symptoms

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Colgate.com 

What is Bruxism?
If you find yourself waking up with sore jaw muscles or a headache, you may be suffering from bruxism - the grinding and clenching of teeth. Bruxism can cause teeth to become painful or loose, and sometimes parts of the teeth are literally ground away. Eventually, bruxism can destroy the surrounding bone and gum tissue. It can also lead to problems involving the jaw joint, such as temporomandibular joint syndrome (TMJ).

How do I Know if I Have Bruxism?
For many people, bruxism is an unconscious habit. They may not even realize they're doing it until someone comments that they make a horrible grinding sound while sleeping. For others, a routine dental checkup is when they discover their teeth are worn or their tooth enamel is fractured.
Other potential signs of bruxism include aching in the face, head and neck. Your dentist can make an accurate diagnosis and determine if the source of facial pain is a result from bruxism.

How is Bruxism Treated?
The appropriate treatment for you will depend on what is causing the problem. By asking careful questions and thoroughly examining your teeth, your dentist can help you determine the potential source of your bruxism. Based on the amount of tooth damage and its likely cause, your dentist may suggest:

  • Wearing an appliance while sleeping - custom-made by your dentist to fit your teeth, the appliance slips over the upper teeth and protects them from grinding against the lower teeth. While an appliance is a good way to manage bruxism, it is not a cure.
  • Finding ways to relax - Because everyday stress seems to be a major cause of bruxism, anything that reduces stress can help-listening to music, reading a book, taking a walk or a bath. It may help to seek counseling to learn effective ways for handling stressful situations. Also, applying a warm, wet washcloth to the side of your face can help relax muscles sore from clenching.
  • Reducing the "high spots" of one or more teeth to even your bite - An abnormal bite, one in which teeth do not fit well together, may also be corrected with new fillings, crowns or orthodontics.

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com.

Gregg L. Kassan, DDS
Family General Dentist
5077 Waterway Drive
Montclair, VA, 22025
Phone: (703) 897-0463
Website: www.MontclairCosmeticDentist.com

Saturday, 28 July 2018

The Value Of A Teeth X-Ray

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Colgate.com that was written by Steve Auger

When you hear the word "X-ray," there's a tendency to envision a youngster sitting around an ER waiting to see if he or she has a broken bone incurred playing sports or just horsing around. But X-rays are just as important to dentists' offices as they are to those of orthopedists. A teeth X-ray is invaluable to any dentist in the maintenance of good oral health when treating a patient. Here's exactly what they are and how dentists incorporate them into their practices.

X-RAYS
Your dentist visually examines all aspects of your teeth and gums during a typical checkup. A teeth X-ray, however, is a diagnostic tool that allows your dentist to gauge your mouth health through factors he can't see with the naked eye, according to the American Dental Association (ADA). Also called radiographs, X-rays can reveal common issues such as cavities, tooth decay and periodontal disease, all the way to more complex problems such as jaw infections and oral cysts. X-rays aren't just for adults though. Dentists take x-rays of children's teeth for some of the same reasons as adults but also some different reasons.

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com.

The remainder of the article details the following:

  • Children and the dentist
  • Reasons for child teeth x-rays
  • X-ray safety for children

Gregg L. Kassan, DDS
Family General Dentist
5077 Waterway Drive
Montclair, VA, 22025
Phone: (703) 897-0463
Website: www.MontclairCosmeticDentist.com

Tuesday, 10 July 2018

7 MouthHealthy Tips for Your Summer Soiree (Part 3 of 3)

Crush, Don’t Cube 
Ice may be your best friend on a hot day, but it's no friend to your teeth. That's because chewing on hard foods, such as ice, can leave your teeth vulnerable to a dental emergency such as a broken tooth and can even damage enamel. If you can, put cans and bottles in a huge tub of ice so your guests won’t be tempted to crunch a few cubes when they’re done with their drinks. If you need ice to put in a glass, use crushed

Serve Infused Water 
Soda and sports drinks are some of the worst drinks for your teeth. They eat away at your teeth, cause dry mouth and are full of sugar. Water, however, is one of the best things you can sip, so serve up a healthy drink with a twist of whatever fruit you’d like. Infused waters are low in sugar and super hydrating. (Just go easy on citrus fruits. The acid in lemons and limes can be harsh on your teeth.) Bonus: Pitchers of infused water will also look beautiful on your table.

Keep Gum Handy 
Your guests may be looking for something to freshen their breath after dinner. Swap out a bowl of mints for a dish of sugar-free gum. Studies using gum with the ADA Seal show that chewing sugarless gum for 20 minutes following meals may help prevent tooth decay. Chewing sugar-free gum gets saliva flowing to wash away food and fights acids produced by cavity-causing bacteria from eating away your teeth.

To read the entire article visit Mouthhealthy.org

Gregg L. Kassan, DDS
Family General Dentist
5077 Waterway Drive
Montclair, VA, 22025
Phone: (703) 897-0463
Website: www.MontclairCosmeticDentist.com

Wednesday, 4 July 2018

Tuesday, 3 July 2018

7 MouthHealthy Tips for Your Summer Soiree (Part 2 of 3)

The Trouble with Toothpicks 
Serving corn on the cob or pulled pork? Your guests may need something to get food unstuck from their teeth. A toothpick is sharp and can pierce gums, giving bacteria a chance to get in. And no one wants a mouth splinter if it breaks. Instead, leave dental picks in a covered dish in the bathroom, or replace toothpicks on the table with soft, flexible, wooden plaque removers like Stim-U-Dent.

Go Seedless 
You can also cut down on food getting stuck in your guests’ teeth by serving seedless foods. Opt for hot dog and hamburger buns without sesame and poppy seeds. Use crunchy fruits in your fruit salad instead of raspberries, kiwi and blackberries, and serve seedless watermelon.

To read the entire article visit Mouthhealthy.org

Gregg L. Kassan, DDS
Family General Dentist
5077 Waterway Drive
Montclair, VA, 22025
Phone: (703) 897-0463
Website: www.MontclairCosmeticDentist.com

Tuesday, 26 June 2018

7 MouthHealthy Tips for Your Summer Soiree (Part 1 of 3)

Serve the Right Kind of Crunch
Potato chips are standard party fare, but they bring unwanted guests into your mouth. Chewed-up chips often settle in the pits of your teeth, giving cavity-causing bacteria the chance to make a meal from your teeth. 

Instead, put apples and pears on your fruit platter, and stock your veggie tray with carrots, celery and raw broccoli. They're like natural toothbrushes, scrubbing off build-up and stimulating saliva to wash away what’s left.

Cheese, Please 
A slice of cheddar can make a grilled burger so much better. Plus, who doesn’t love a cheese platter? Dairy products like milk, yogurt and cheese are low in sugar and rich in calcium and phosphorous, which strengthen and protect enamel. Research also suggests that eating more dairy may lower your chances for developing gum disease. So go ahead and say cheese!

To read the entire article visit Mouthhealthy.org

Gregg L. Kassan, DDS
Family General Dentist
5077 Waterway Drive
Montclair, VA, 22025
Phone: (703) 897-0463
Website: www.MontclairCosmeticDentist.com

Wednesday, 20 June 2018

Tuesday, 12 June 2018

How to Fight Mouth Germs and Keep Your Smile Healthy

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Colgate.com that was written by Brenna Stone

Does the thought of mouth germs taking up residence on your teeth make you feel a little uncomfortable? It should! Masses of harmful microorganisms in the mouth can form plaque, the sticky substance that adheres to the teeth and gumline. Plaque can really harm your teeth and gums. When it isn't removed by regular brushing and flossing, it can lead to cavities and gum disease! Find out what you can do to reduce the amount of germs in your mouth.

Regular Toothbrushing
Toothbrushing is a powerful tool for fighting germs. At the minimum, brush twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste; once after breakfast and once before going to bed. There is no harm in brushing your teeth more frequently. You can brush after meals to cut down on plaque formation and to freshen your breath. Spend a full two minutes gently brushing all surfaces of your teeth and your tongue. Use a toothpaste like Colgate Total that is designed to keep your mouth clean and to fight germs.

Bacteria can flourish on your toothbrush as well. Change your toothbrush when it begins to look worn, according to American Dental Association. The American Dental Association recommends switching to a new brush about every three to four months. It is best to leave your bristles in the open air; a closed, moist environment can harbor more bacteria. Also, don't share brushes; it is possible to transfer mouth germs this way.

Don't Forget to Floss
Daily flossing is another important way to keep your mouth clean and healthy. Flossing can help to remove plaque from places that your toothbrush can't reach. Slide your floss in between the teeth. Also clean at the base of each tooth, removing plaque and food debris from underneath the gum line.

Your Diet and Mouth Germs
What you eat can also help to support a healthy smile. Eating lots of sugary and starchy foods will increase the amount of sugars that are available for bacteria in your mouth to thrive upon. Try cutting back on sweet treats and snacking on fresh fruits and veggies instead. When eating grains, be sure to choose whole grains.

Take good care of your teeth with daily brushing and flossing. Eat a balanced diet and see your dentist for regular check-ups. Your dentist can check for signs of cavities and gum disease, the dental hygienist can also clean your teeth, removing the plaque and tartar (hardened dental plaque) that is on your teeth. With excellent oral hygiene, mouth germs don't stand a chance!

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com.

Gregg L. Kassan, DDS
Family General Dentist
5077 Waterway Drive
Montclair, VA, 22025
Phone: (703) 897-0463
Website: www.MontclairCosmeticDentist.com

Tuesday, 5 June 2018

How to Brush Your Teeth Properly: A Quick Guide

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Colgate.com that was written by AM Hopkins

Everyone knows that brushing their teeth plays a major role in their overall health, but they may not be aware of the correct way to brush their teeth. The American Dental Association recommends that you brush your teeth at least twice each day; here is a quick guide to ensure you know how to do it properly.

Purchase the right toothbrush. Before you even begin the process of brushing your teeth, it's important that you have the right toothbrush. The type of toothbrush you select depends on your specific needs. If you need a toothbrush mostly for removing plaque, a soft-bristled brush is best. On the other hand, if you are concerned about reaching hard-to-reach spaces, you should consider a toothbrush with a smaller head. in the Colgate Oral Care resources.

Take your time. You should spend at least two minutes brushing your teeth. This may seem like a long time - the average person usually falls short of this goal - but it is necessary ensure that your teeth are clean. If you're worried about reaching this goal, consider investing in a toothbrush that has an automatic timer or use a stopwatch.

Be thorough. Tilt your toothbrush to a 45 degree angle and ensure that you are cleaning both the outer and inner surfaces of your upper and lower teeth. It is equally important to clean the chewing surfaces of your teeth, as well.

Be gentle. When brushing your teeth, it's important to use short, precise strokes. This ensures that you don't cause any trauma to your mouth and that you reach the specific areas you are trying to target. You should brush the entire surface of the tooth in a gentle back and forth motion.

Don't forget your tongue. Brushing your tongue is an essential part of maintaining proper oral care. Many people often overlook this step, but it is important to both your overall oral hygiene and the freshness of your breath.

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com.

Gregg L. Kassan, DDS
Family General Dentist
5077 Waterway Drive
Montclair, VA, 22025
Phone: (703) 897-0463
Website: www.MontclairCosmeticDentist.com

Sunday, 3 June 2018

Dental Sealants for Children

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about the importance of dental sealants as a preventive dental treatment for your children!


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Gregg L. Kassan, DDS
Family General Dentist
5077 Waterway Drive
Montclair, VA, 22025
Phone: (703) 897-0463
Website: www.MontclairCosmeticDentist.com

Tuesday, 29 May 2018

Family Guide to Oral Health

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Colgate.com

By following the information in this guide, you and your family can have healthy teeth and gums to last a lifetime. As a parent, you can work with your children to help them understand why good oral care is important - and show them how to do it right!

Four Steps to a Bright Smile

  1. Brush at least twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste, especially after eating breakfast and before bedtime.
  2. Floss every day.
  3. Limit the number of times you eat snacks each day.
  4. Visit your dentist regularly.

It's easy to guide your family toward good oral health. All it takes is the right information and a little practice to keep them moving in the right direction!

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com.

The remainder of the article details the following:

  • Infographics on how to brush
  • Infographcis on how to floss
  • A list of preventive dental care tips!

Gregg L. Kassan, DDS
Family General Dentist
5077 Waterway Drive
Montclair, VA, 22025
Phone: (703) 897-0463
Website: www.MontclairCosmeticDentist.com

Sunday, 27 May 2018

Stress & Oral Health

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about Stress and your Oral Health!


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Gregg L. Kassan, DDS
Family General Dentist
5077 Waterway Drive
Montclair, VA, 22025
Phone: (703) 897-0463
Website: www.MontclairCosmeticDentist.com

Sunday, 20 May 2018

Periodontal Screening

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about Periodontal Screening!



Gregg L. Kassan, DDS
Family General Dentist
5077 Waterway Drive
Montclair, VA, 22025
Phone: (703) 897-0463
Website: www.MontclairCosmeticDentist.com

Friday, 11 May 2018

What 10 Common Mouth Issues Really Look Like (Part 3 of 3)

You know good dental habits can help prevent things like cavities and gingivitis, but you may not know what conditions like these really look like or how they can affect your mouth. Use this visual guide to learn more about some of the most common dental health issues, symptoms to watch for and the potential treatments that are available. Please note: This content is for informational purposes only. Only a dentist, physician or other qualified health care professional can make a diagnosis.

Darkened Tooth








There are two reasons your tooth may change color after trauma: It’s either trying to protect the nerve or it’s dying. If it’s protecting the nerve, your tooth may look a little darker than the ones next to it. If it changes colors like a bruise (from pink to gray), this means your tooth is most likely dead. You may need a root canal, usually followed by a crown. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the tooth. If it is a baby tooth, you may be able to leave it alone until it falls out.

Canker Sores








Canker sores are small white or gray sores with a red border that appear your lips, the back of your throat or under your tongue. Their exact cause is uncertain but some suggest that immune system problems, bacteria or viruses may be play a role. They are also more common in women.

Canker sores aren’t contagious and usually heal on their own after one or two weeks. Over-the-counter creams and mouthwashes may give you temporary relief. Until it heals, stay away from hot, spicy or acidic foods because these can irritate the sore.

Cancer








Each year, approximately 40,000 new cases of oral cancer and cancers of the throat, tonsils and back of the tongue are diagnosed. Tobacco use, alcohol abuse and HPV all increase your chance of developing these cancers. Men are twice more likely to get oral cancer than women. During regular checkups, your dentist will check your mouth for symptoms like red or white patches, sores that won’t heal and rough, crusty spots. If anything suspicious is found, your dentist will order more testing or refer you to a specialist. The image above is only one example of how oral cancer might appear.

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

Gregg L. Kassan, DDS
Family General Dentist
5077 Waterway Drive
Montclair, VA, 22025
Phone: (703) 897-0463
Website: www.MontclairCosmeticDentist.com